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Curry Powder Recipes.

There are lots of Curry powder recipes from different regions of India. Curry Powder is one of a number of mixtures of spices used in Indian cooking and (unsuprisingly) is specifically used for curry dishes. Others spice mixtures are Garam Masala, Rasam powder and Sambar powder. These all have their own uses and, although they may look similar, they should not be confused with each other.

Of course you can buy curry powder ready made or you can make your own. Personally I rarely do either as I prefer to make what I need for each meal as I cook it. The main advantage of this is that whole spices last a lot longer than ground spices (once they are ground the essential oils which give them their flavour start to evaporate), but it can sometimes be useful when time is tight. I have also made curry powders for other people who don't have all the spices to hand but like a curry occasionally.

There are lots of different curry powder recipe that I have made; here are some of them - I will add more as I remember them. You can experiment with different quantities and add other spices to your hearts content.



General Notes

These apply to all the curry powder recipes.

Ingredients

I give proportions as multiples or fractions of a 'spoon'. It doesn't matter what size spoon as long as you keep roughly the same proportions; it could be a teaspoon or tablespoon, it could even be an ounce, gram, or multiples depending on the quantity you want to make. Don't make more than you are likely to use within about 6 months.

Most of the spices are whole spices unless otherwise noted. You can use ground spices if you wish but be aware that if you mix ground and whole you will be changing the proportions a little as the ground spices are more compact.

Some spices like cinnamon cannot be measured in spoonfuls - see individual notes.

Method

How long you roast the seeds for is a matter of taste, but don't overdo it or the seeds will burn and the resultant powder will taste burnt. Generally I just wait till just a hint of smoke starts to appear.

Some people like to sieve the powder after grinding and a lot of curry powder recipes recommend this, personally I like a bit of crunch to it so I don't usually do this - up to you.

Storage

Store all ground spices in a jar with a tight lid in a cool, dark place. Use within six months.






Curry powder recipe #1 All-in-one

This is a simple 'ready to use' curry powder which can be used for curries, coronation chicken or added to soup to spice it up. It is slightly hot due to the powder.chilli

Basic Ingredients

8 spoons coriander
4 spoons cumin
2 spoon turmeric powder
1 spoon mustard seed
1 spoon ground ginger
spoon chilli powder

Note on Ingredients

See General Notes

Chilli Powder. Clearly a matter of taste. Depends how hot you want it and how hot the chilli powder is. Use more or less to suit.

Basic Method

Heat a dry frying pan (no oil)
Put in the coriander and cumin.
Roast for a few seconds until the coriander seeds just start to darken.
Grind all the spices in a grinder.

Notes on Method

See General Notes

Curry powder recipe #2 Simple and Aromatic

A reasonably simple more aromatic mix. This is my 'classic' curry powder which is sweet, nutty and aromatic - it is not hot, you need to separately add chilli powder or chillis to get the heat.

Basic Ingredients

3 spoons coriander
1 spoon cumin
1 spoon fenugreek
spoon cardamom seeds (i.e. the seeds removed from their pods)
spoon peppercorns
spoon cloves
spoon turmeric powder
spoon white poppy seeds

Note on Ingredients

See General Notes

Basic Method

Heat a dry frying pan (no oil)
Put in the coriander, cumin, fenugreek, peppercorns, cloves and poppy seeds.
Roast for a few seconds until the coriander seeds just start to darken.
Grind all the spices in a grinder.
Smell the aroma (this is not essential but highly recommended)

Notes on Method

See General Notes.

Curry powder recipe #3 Andhra Style - Spicy

For the braver souls amongst you, this one is typical of the Andhra region and particularly Hyderabad. In keeping with region it is quite fiery. It is very good in sautéed vegetables and Hyderabadi Biryani.

Basic Ingredients

6 spoons coriander
3 spoons cumin
3 spoons turmeric
2 spoons black mustard seed
1 spoon cardamom seeds (removed from the pods)
1 spoon fenugreek
1 spoon fennel seeds
1 spoon crushed dried chillies
spoon black peppercorns
spoon dried curry leaves
Cloves
Cinnamon

Notes on Ingredients

See General Notes.

If you use teaspoons then this will give you about 1oz (25g) of curry powder.

Cloves. These are a very strong taste so go carefully. If your basic 'spoon' is a teaspoon then use only 1 or 2, multiply up as appropriate.

Cinnamon. These come in sticks rather than spoonfuls, if using teaspoons then about 1" (2.5cm) stick.

Chillis. You can use as much as you feel comfortable with. I have suggested a quantity which should be reasonably hot (probably not up the the genuine Andhra standards, but that's a bit mental for most western tastes)

Basic Method

Heat a dry frying pan roast the following spices

Coriander
Cumin
Mustard Seeds
Peppercorns
Fenugreek
Fennel
Cloves
Cinnamon

Grind these and all the other ingredients in a grinder to a fine powder

Notes on Method

See General Notes.

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